Heaven is a dear friend and an art studio

I went to heaven this past weekend. Well, okay, the 11-year old inside me did. I went to visit my friend Andrea, who teaches at a local art studio called Studio Arts Dallas (http://www.studioartsdallas.com/). When I pulled into the parking lot I noticed that the building housing this heaven was an old Whataburger, a particularly fond slice of nostalgia that made me smile. It was then that I made my lunch plans for the day.

Stepping inside the doors was like calling my inner 11-year old out to play and come out to play she did. I took in the sights with the same excitement I did back in school when it was time for art class. It was like a secret hideaway; a place far away from the cares of the world. Watching the students come in, I wondered if they felt the same way.

The studio itself might possibly be a neat-freak’s worst nightmare, but the messiness of all that free falling creativity just made it more appealing and perfect. The used paintbrushes, dried paint smears on the small children’s chairs, artfully loved aprons, and student creations sitting around here and there like stepping stones to the triumphant pièce de résistance were all exactly in the right place.

My friend was in definitely in her element. With her usual fun, lively personality she was ready to do what she loves best … art. She loves teaching and is a natural at it. “It’s difficult to pin down what I love most about this place; there is so much. The staff is amazing and being surrounded by creativity all the time is wonderful. Watching the kids as they create something for the first time, especially on the wheel, is priceless.” When asked what her least favorite part is, she said “leaving.”

She has an easy, natural rapport with the children and her excitement about art is contagious. Her objective this morning was to teach her students how to throw clay, with pottery being her specialty. With the innocence and glee of a child playing in the mud, she explained the process in a way that was fun and easy. As some students worked on the wheels, a couple of others, myself included, got to work with pinched clay. I felt so honored to finally be in an art class with her! In my mind, this was like sitting down to hear your favorite author narrate his own book! With Andrea’s easy instruction, we were shaping and molding clay into human heads in no time!

The time flew by so quickly. Andrea’s next class, still life drawing, was up next and the place was bustling with activity. While making my exit, the act of walking past easels with fresh white paper was excrutiating! Oh, well, perhaps a drawing class is in my future. As I pulled out of the parking lot, picturing the juicy Whataburger I was about to enjoy, I realized that my love of art wasn’t just designated for my inner 11-year old anymore … it is still just as alive in this 40+ adult!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know someone who’s shining their light? Contact us and tell us their story! We love to network with people doing things that bring them joy and serve others in the process. We seek out opportunities to shine light on the good works of individuals and organizations! We would also love to hear your story and/or have you participate in our gallery. There’s no one quite like you and we’d like to acknowledge that! THANK YOU FOR SHINING YOUR LIGHT!

3 thoughts on “Heaven is a dear friend and an art studio

  1. Studio Arts is a Work of Art in itself! Thanks to all the facilitators, teachers, kids and grownups alike who constantly feed and participate and contribute into Barley Vogel’s vision for this sanctuary of creative fun and bliss!

    Like

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